Posts Tagged ‘Alfonso Alberti’

Marco Stroppa’s Music, between commitment and technology…by Alfonso Alberti

Marco Stroppa (1959) is a composer with a multi-faceted training: for him the intersections between the different art and knowledge domains are customary frequentations.
After musical experiences in various Italian conservatories, he undertook scientific studies at MIT’s Media Lab in the U.S.: computer music, cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence. And then the electronic experiences: they aren’t a mandatory condition for his music writing, but a mindset that Stroppa takes on also when composing for acoustic-only ensembles.
Recently the audience in Milano had a chance to attend to the performance of a work of his, Nous sommes l’air, pas la terre (2003-2004) for accordion and viola, where a further intersection comes to the fore. It is the intersection between music and reality: music lives in the world and reads it, reads the evil, the violence, the unavoidable – and avoidable – tragedies.
The title of the work quotes a sentence, epigraph to a book by Svetlana Aleksievic, Byelorussian journalist and writer, well known for her inquiries into some dramatic events of the Twentieth Century. In that book (Voices from Chernobyl), the author lets the survivors of the Chernobyl tragedy talk, collecting their scathing testimony…

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About the 4th volume of DUETS’Line…

Here you can find a review (in Italian version) about the 4th volume of DUETS’ Line, “Il pianoforte in Italia tra il jazz e il ‘900 eurocolto“, entirely dedicated to the piano, published on All About Jazz.

Interpreters: Dado Moroni and Alfonso Alberti
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Originale iniziativa dell’etichetta Limen, questo cofanetto – ennesimo di una serie che include un CD e un DVD – nasce con l’intenzione di confrontare pianismo jazz e classico avvicinando cinque brani composti ed eseguiti da Dado Moroni (alcuni con l’accompagnamento al contrabbasso di Aldo Zunino) a brani di compositori come Niccolò Castiglioni e luigi Dallapiccola, eseguiti da Alfonso Alberti.

Moroni, che sta vivendo un periodo di particolare smalto, svolge la sua parte in modo superbo, sia per espressività sia per ricchezza di stilemi. “Brother Alfred”, condotto in solitudine, è ad esempio un condensato di storia del piano jazz, ma è anche di grande trasporto; “Walkin’ The Town”, un classico blues attraversato dall’ottimo contrabbasso di Zunino, è riuscitissimo, così come l’ultima traccia da lui interpretata dell’album, “Cedar’s Sphere”. Oltre mezz’ora di jazz ad alto livello.

Di stampo chiaramente diverso, invece, il contributo di Alberti, che dopo gli otto minuti di Castiglioni si dedica quasi interamente al “Quaderno musicale di Annalibera”, lavoro di Dallapiccola del 1952 composto di undici piccoli brani. La cui rarefazione contrappuntistica, pur incantevole, non potrebbe essere più in contrasto con quanto messo in scena da Moroni nella prima parte del lavoro.

Un lavoro, quindi, di curiosa contrapposizione. che si lascia apprezzare o separatamente, per la qualità dei diversissimi contributi, o proprio per il contrasto che glabalmente si produce tra le due sue parti.

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Edgard Varèse’s and Bill Viola’s Deserts, by Alfonso Alberti

I had a chance to see Bill Viola’s movie, Déserts, in 2008 at Rome’s “Music Park”, in the framework of a concert of the Ensemble Intercontemporain for the Accademia Filarmonica Romana. That experience of an intersection between contemporary videoart and 20th-century music undoubtedly was, a little later, one of the strongest drivers (or even the main driver) of the basic idea of this column. But, ironically, only at the twenty-second issue of the series comes to light the article that should have been the first.

Between the years 1950 and 1954, Edgard Varèse, composer whose significance for the following 20th-century developments is hardly overvalued, wrote Déserts, a broad composition for winds, piano, a wide range of percussions and magnetic tape. The meaning of this work is staggering, because it is one of the earliest compositions where the instrumental live sounds and the electronic recorded sounds interact. The two sound worlds are sharply separated: among the seven sections of the work, the odd-numbered ones are for the instruments, the even-numbered are electronics-only. In a live performance, then, you can see three times the unusual sight of a director halting the musicians, who fold their arms and hand over to the recorded tape.

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“And we began to look into the stars”: the spiritual element in Karheinz Stockhausen‘s music, by Alfonso Alberti

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The intersections between music and spirituality are many and most varied. Undoubtedly, in a more general sense, some form of spirituality could and should be part of every musical listening experience. As for Stockhausen’s music, anyway, the spiritual element is far from being unspecific, and there are strategies implemented in such a way that the listener is able to live a very peculiar experience.
The watcher should feel separated from what temporarily he deserted by getting into the concert hall; s/he should feel fully immersed in the sound environment; the experience shouldn’t be mediated by the rationality filter; the time should be suspended in a kind of trance where thinking surrenders to vision; and this vision should touch just what was never before experienced – these seem to be Stockhausen’s intentions when he conceives some of his most important compositions.
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“C’est tout don Juan qui est là”: Alfred Cortot and piano interpretation, by Alfonso Alberti

«The exterior correctness of playing, the mechanical perfection, is pointless, if it doesn’t shed a better light on the generating principles of the art work”, wrote Alfred Cortot. He, sometimes, took many wrong notes, in particular in the last stage of his career: «He discovered the sound and lost the notes, he had staggering ideas and slips of the fingers», someone wrote about him.
In his last years, many among his audiences were struck by performances which, probably fairly, deserved harsh critiques. But if now we are talking about him and not about someone else, it clearly depends on the fact that the drops suffered in the last years do not depict in a correct way the nature of Cortot’s art, and why the boldness of his interpreting career is unambiguously confronting us.
His concerns were elsewhere: in particular, in the world of imagination.
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Music and Film I: The Double Life of Veronique, by Alfonso Alberti

If you want to tell somebody how to go from one place to another, you typically refer to a sequence of streets, squares and buildings, using phrases such as “straight on”, “turn left after a hundred meters”, “beside the law courts building” and the likes. In Krzysztof Kieslowski’s film, The Double Life of Veronique, on the other hand, Véronique was mailed a tape cassette where only noises were recorded – and that’s all. She knows she has a rendezvous and that the cassette holds directions to the place and the route. Among the recorded noises a station’s loudspeaker can be heard: and so Véronique, also taking into account the stamp on the parcel, goes to St. Lazare’s railway station. The creaking of a door can be heard, and the dull “Excuse me, excuse me” of a waitress: and here she is, in that coffee shop near the station, with the creaking door and the waitress with a dull voice. An ambulance’s siren is on the tape; and then from the shop’s window she can see the remains of a car accident that just happened.
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Alfonso Alberti on Limenmusic Web Tv

From today on Limenmusic Web Tv at www.limenmusic.com you will find a new concert, by the Italian pianist and musicologist Alfonso Alberti.

In this concert:

Luca Francesconi – Mambo
Flavio Emilio Scogna – Cadenza seconda
Stefano Bulfon - Giostre di cristallo (WORLD PREMIÈRE RECORDING)
Paul Méfano – Mémoire de la porte blanche

We remember you that all the concerts are ON-DEMAND, so are always available on Limenmusic Web Tv!!!
To see the entire concert you have to subscribe for free at www.limenmusic.com

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Alfonso Alberti in concert at Festival MITO

On September 8th 2011 at 09.00 p.m. (GMT+1) at Auditorium San Fedele in Milan: Alfonso Alberti in concert!

Program:

Arnold Schoenberg – Drei Klavierstücke op. 11
Arnold Schoenberg - Lieder op. 6 n. 3, 4, 6 e 8 and Lied op. 2 n. 1 (with Soprano Lorna Windsor)

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Arnold Schoenberg – Quartetto n. 1
Arnold Schoenberg – Quartetto n. 2
performed by Quartetto di Cremona

In collaboration with Musica/Realtà
Introduces: Luigi Pestalozza

This is the same program of Schoenberg’s concert organized in Monaco one hundred years ago, in 1911. Kandinsky, a few days after seeing the concert, wrote to Schoenberg and they began their extraordinary correspondence.

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Alfonso Alberti in concert on Limenmusic Web Tv

From September 9. 2011 on Limenmusic Web Tv (www.limenmusic.com), you will find a new concert, by the Italian pianist and musicologist Alfonso Alberti.

Alfonso Alberti in concert

This talented pianist will perform for us:

Luca Francesconi – Mambo
Flavio Emilio Scogna – Cadenza seconda
Stefano Bulfon - Giostre di cristallo (WORLD PREMIÈRE RECORDING)
Paul Méfano – Mémoire de la porte blanche

Born 1976, Alfonso Alberti studied piano at the “G. Verdi” School of Music, Milan, with Piero Rattalino and Riccardo Risaliti, graduating with honours, and he attended specialization courses held by Massimiliano Damerini, Rosalyn Tureck, Franco Scala and Oleg Marshev. He made his debut as a pianist at the age of 17, in the Sala Verdi of Milan Conservatory, where he performed the Concerto n. 4 by Sergei Rachmaninoff with the RAI Orchestra…
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We remember you that all the concerts are ON-DEMAND, so are always available on Limenmusic Web Tv!!!
To see the entire concert you have to subscribe for free at www.limenmusic.com

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Robert HP Platz’s music: Wunderblock and memory

Robert HP Platz (b. 1951), German musician who allies an intense activity as a conductor to the activity as a composer, weaves in his pieces references to the most different disciplines.

Hallmark of his poetics is, simply, that since 1989 up today Platz has been working at a single great work, of which each composition is but a partial expression. It doesn’t mean that the composer has been writing an expanded piece made of many parts, which, as soon as completed, in the end will be performed as a unity: the «formal polyphony» that Platz aims to has mostly a conceptual meaning and does not aim to become one in a final summary performance.

The beginning is a pivotal piece, Kern («core»), upon which a kind of «mantle» (Hülle, in German) is progressively spread, where then echoes (Echo) and consequences of the most different kinds spring from. In some subsections of this total work, the polyphony between piece and piece is concretely implemented: the Up Down Strange Charm piece is but the Up piece performed at the same time with the Down and Strange and Charm pieces, all together. (Let’s remark, here, the intersection between music and not less that subatomic physics: up, down, strange and charm are four quark “flavours”, the ultimate components of the matter.)
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